Gastroenterology Services

 

 
Colonoscopy

 

Colonoscopy enables your doctor to examine the lining of your colon (large intestine) for abnormalities by inserting a long, flexible, lighted tube as thick as your finger into your anus and slowly advancing it into the rectum and colon.  The colon must be completely clean for the procedure to be accurate and complete, so be sure to follow the prep instructions carefully. 

Click here for Colonoscopy Prep Instructions.

 

Colonoscopy is well-tolerated and rarely causes much pain.  You might feel pressure, bloating or cramping during the procedure.  Your doctor will sedate to help you relax and better tolerate any discomfort, unless you request otherwise.  You will lie on your side or back while the doctor slowly advances the colonoscope through your large intestine to examine the lining.  You doctor will examine the lining again as he slowly withdrawals the colonoscope.  The procedure usually take 15 to 60 minutes, although you should plan on two to three hours for admission and recovery. 

 

After your procedure, you will receive written discharge instructions, although you will have to wait for the results of any biopsies performed.  If you were given sedation during the procedure, someone must drive you home.  Even if you feel alert after the procedure, your judgment and reflexes could be impaired for the rest of the day.  You might have some cramping or bloating because of the air introduced into the colon during the examination.  This should disappear quickly when you pass gas. 

 

Although complications after a colonoscopy are uncommon, contact your doctor or go to the emergency department if you notice severe abdominal pain, fever and chills, or rectal bleeding of more than one-half cup. 

 

Click Here for Colonoscopy Prep Kit Instructions

 

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Esophagoduodenoscopy (EGD)

 

Esophagoduodenoscopy also known as Upper Endoscopy or EGD enables your doctor to examine the lining of your upper intestinal tract by inserting a long, flexible, lighted tube through the mouth and slowing advancing it into the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and the beginning of the small intestine.  Your stomach must be empty for this procedure so be accurate and complete so be sure to follow your instructions completely. 

Click Here for EGD Instructions

 

During the procedure, you should feel little to no pain and it will not interfere with your breathing.  The physician will sedate you to keep you comfortable, unless you request otherwise, then he will insert a mouth piece to help you keep your mouth open during the procedure.  The endoscopy will be inserted slowly and air is introduced to allow the physician see better.  The physician will examine the GI tract, looking closely for any problems that require evaluation, diagnosis, or treatment.  The procedure usually take 15 to 20 minutes, although you should plan on two to three hours for admission and recovery. 

 

After your procedure, you will receive written discharge instructions, although you will have to wait for the results of any biopsies performed.  If you were given sedation during the procedure, someone must drive you home.  Even if you feel alert after the procedure, your judgment and reflexes could be impaired for the rest of the day.  You might have some cramping or bloating because of the air introduced into the stomach during the examination.  This should disappear within 24 hours.

 

Although complications after an EGD are uncommon, contact your doctor or go to the emergency department if you notice severe abdominal pain, fever and chills, or bleeding.

 

Click Here for EGD Instructions

 

pH Testing

 

Esophageal pH monitoring used for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It provides direct physiologic measurement of acid in the esophagus and is the most objective method to document reflux disease, assess the severity of the disease and monitor the response of the disease to medical or surgical treatment. It can also be used in diagnosing laryngopharyngeal reflux.

 

A thin tube is passed through your nose into your stomach. The tube is then is pulled back into your esophagus. A monitor attached to the tube measures the acid level in your esophagus.

You will wear the monitor on a strap and record your symptoms and activity over the next 24 hours. You will return to the office the next day and the tube will be removed. The information from the monitor will be compared with your diary notes.

 

Breath Tests

 

The H. pylori breath test is a simple and safe test used to detect an active H. pylori infection.  Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a bacteria found in the inner lining of the stomach or duodenum that causes chronic inflammation. H. Pylori has been associated with several health conditions, including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer.

 

During the test, you will be asked to exhale into a balloon-like bag. The air you breathe into this bag is tested to provide a basis for comparison (called a baseline sample). You will then be asked to drink a small amount of a pleasant lemon-flavored solution. Fifteen minutes after drinking the solution, a second breath sample will be taken. The air you breathe into this bag is tested for an increase in carbon dioxide.

 

Your physician will notify you of the results and his plan for treatment if necessary.

 

Office Visits

 

Office visits are available for all patients, with or without a referral from your primary care physician.  Please contact us to make your appointment. 

 

 

Clearwater Gastroenterology

2517 17th Street, Suite B

Lewiston, ID 83501

Phone: 208-743-4373

Fax: 208-743-3369

Gem State Endoscopy

3709 14th Street

Lewiston, ID 83501

Phone: 208-298-2141

Fax: 208-746-3144

Hours of Operation:

 

Clearwater Gastroenterology

Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Friday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Gem State Endoscopy

Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Friday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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